Recommendable Reading

Here I am keeping a running list of some recommendable literature I’ve read of late.

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 triggerpointbook.com

This is better than acupressure. One of the best books I’ve ever used for pain relief.

 

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I had no idea there was so much un-explored territory in the U.S. This book follows the lives and experiences of some of the passionate, quirky, and gutsy people who climb the world’s tallest trees.

Did you know that in the upper branches of Red can have a meter of soil in them? With all sorts of bugs and small animals, and grasses and shrubs  and trees growing in it? I had not idea until I read this book. The author describes going berry-picking, a couple hundred feet off the ground.

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This book has made it onto my top five list. After a year-long break I resumed the reading of Victor Hugo’s gripping masterpiece. Actually, I listened to it on CD. I listened through all 46 CDs in a month (listening to many sections numerous times). I laughed, I wept, I sighed, I pondered, I made goals to improve myself, I called up long-lost friends, I journaled, I prayed. Through the listening of the book I also learned to crochet and completed my first hat, organized my room, took up drawing again, drove the length of my state twice, and cleaned out my fridge. Life changing book.

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Michael Pollan is becoming a real hero of mine:
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Two years ago I attended a lecture in Salt Lake by Michael Pollan. His eloquence on the topic of food and sustainability blew me away. I’ve been something of a Pollan missionary ever since. In the past 3 weeks of reading this book, Botany of Desire, I have missed my train stop FOUR TIMES! I keep thinking if I ever become a professor, I’d love to teach a class on this book. It turns out other people have already had this thought–on this PBS website you’ll find trailers for the recently aired program on this book along with extensive lesson plans and interactive resources. If you don’t read this book at least make sure to check out this amazingly informative site.

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Christiane Northrup wrote my favorite women’s health book, Women’s Bodies Women’s Wisdom, so when I saw this title on the shelf of a used book store in Moab I snatched it up. I read all 700 pages of it in less than a month. I recommend it to women everywhere. I have never read another book that so thoroughly stepped me through all the stages of my life up until now. Healing, insightful, inspiring.

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I read this book in honor of Darwin’s big year (he was born 200 years ago and 150 years ago he published the book that made him famous). Dr. Neil Shubin is a professor of comparative anatomy and the paleontologist who discovered Tiktaalik, the four-legged fish. He writes about the complexity of evolution in very digestible and entertaining terms, explaining how understanding our evolutionary past is key to understanding ourselves. A good read.

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This is a beautiful read by a brilliant writer. I laughed and I cried and I wrote pages of notes. The Old Man and the Sea served me as a great commuter book. In 20-minute spurts it taught me profound lessons on perseverance, gratitude, patience, humility, and love.

This is one of my favorite quotes, which the old man thought after days out at sea trying to kill a stubborn fish:

“Imagine if each day a man must try to kill the moon, he thought. The moon runs away. But imagine if a man each day should have to kill the sun? We were born lucky, he thought.”



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